Common Job Search Mistakes

Posted: 11.04.2015

Spend an insufficient amount of time on job search activities.
Many experts believe job-hunting should in itself be a full-time job. If you’re in school or employed while seeking a better job, your time may be somewhat limited. But you should put as much time as you can into it. Try to contact people in your network every day with the goal of setting up interviews with your contacts or people they’ve referred you to.
 
Take a “scattershot” search approach.
Some job-seekers think the best way to find a new job is to apply for as many jobs with as many employers as possible. Some job-seekers even apply to multiple positions within the same company and jobs they are not totally qualified for. The faulty thinking behind this strategy is that the more jobs you apply for, the more likely at least one of these efforts will result in a job interview. Beyond the flawed logic here, the other problem with this strategy is giving yourself a false sense that you are actively seeking a new job.
                                             
Rely mostly or only on advertised job openings for leads.
While job ads (in newspapers or online job boards) are useful research tools, you as the job-seeker should not count on these job openings as your sole — or even a major — job-search method. Very few job-seekers ever get a job through this method; however, job ads do serve a useful purpose in researching the qualifications employers seek. You can then develop a tailored resume and cover letter full of keywords, even using some of the employer’s own buzzwords.
 
Uncomfortable with networking or avoid it all together.
If you’re squeamish about networking because it feels like using people, you’ve got the wrong idea about networking. But you’re not alone in this feeling. Many individuals are uncomfortable with the notion of networking because of the creepy — and untrue — idea that networking means using people. Successful networking doesn’t mean milking your contacts for all they’re worth; it means a give and take. Networking is at its most effective when both the networker and the contact reciprocally benefit from the relationship. Even if your contact does not benefit immediately from knowing you, he or she should gain something from the relationship eventually.
 
Have a “one-size-fits-all” resume.
In a recent study by CareerBuilder.com, 71 percent of hiring managers said they preferred a resume customized for the open position. And in an age when we can all easily manipulate our own computer files, there’s little excuse not to tailor your resume — at least somewhat — to each job you apply for. Maybe you simply adjust your Objective statement. Maybe you tweak your Professional Profile or Qualifications Summary to suit each job. Perhaps you emphasize different skills and accomplishments for each job you apply to.
 
Resume is not a marketing document loaded with keywords and accomplishments.
Too many job-seekers confuse resumes with job applications. They think a resume should be a dry recitation of every aspect of their job history, including duties and responsibilities of each job. In fact, resumes should be marketing documents that entice employers to invite you for an interview. That means that resumes should focus on the highlights of what will sell you to an employer — information that tells the employer what you can contribute to the organization. In today’s world of job-hunting, accomplishments and keywords are two of the critical elements your resume needs to prompt employers to interview you.
 
Post your resume on a few job boards and wait for employers to contact you.
The key to any successful job search is mixing up your job-search techniques so you do not rely on any one method, whether it is posting resumes on the Internet, answering ads, networking, making targeted contacts, or cold-calling. Statistics vary on the percentage of job-seekers who find jobs through the Internet, but most studies suggest figures in the single digits. The largest percentage of job-seekers succeed in landing jobs through networking. Therefore, job-hunting time should be invested in proportion to the methods that are likely to be most fruitful. You will likely find it more effective, for example, to spend four hours networking with colleagues at the meeting of a professional organization in your field than to use those same four hours posting your resume on Internet job boards.
 
Not following up with each employer after sending your resume and cover letter.
Some job-seekers think their task is complete once they send their cover letter and resume to an employer, but the reality is that their work has just begun. Job-seekers should state in the cover letter that they will follow-up with the employer (ideally the hiring manager) at some specified time, usually a week to ten days. That’s the easy part; the hard part for most job-seekers is actually following-up.

To read the full article: http://www.quintcareers.com/job-reality-checks/
 

View All News

Jobs by Category

Please log in to access this page. If you do not have an account, please Register.



Sign In

Username
Password
 
 

Forgot Your Password? |  Registration

Jobs by City

Please log in to access this page. If you do not have an account, please Register.



Sign In

Username
Password
 
 

Forgot Your Password? |  Registration